Posted by: fatherandson | 27 June 2007

Idioms with ‘hat’

I’m sure that you understand what ‘a hat’ means in Vietnamese. In English, ‘hat’ is used in various idioms. Let me introduce some. You will find them very interesting.

at the drop of a hat:if you do something at the drop of a hat, you do it suddenly and easily, often without any preparation. We now have a situation where laws may be changed at the drop of a hat.

be talking through your hat (old-fashioned, informal):to be talking about a subject as if you know a lot about it when in fact you know very little. The man’s talking through his hat. He doesn’t know the first thing about banking.

be wearing your [teacher’s/lawyer’s etc.] hat:to be acting as you do when you are working as a teacher, lawyer etc., which may be different from the way you act in other situations. I was wearing my teacher’s hat at the meeting.

come/go cap in hand (British, American & Australian, American):to ask someone for money or help in a way which makes you feel ashamed. I had to go cap in hand to my parents again to ask for some money. (often+to)

hang up your hat: to leave your job for ever. When I stop enjoying my work, that’ll be the time to hang up my hat.

hats off to someone:something that you say when you want to express your admiration for someone. Hats off to her – it takes a lot of courage to go traveling on your own at that age.

I take my hat off to someone (British, American & Australian, American):something that you say which means that you admire and respect someone for something they have done. I take my hat off to people who do voluntary work in their spare time.

I’ll eat my hat (old-fashioned):if you say you will eat your hat if something happens or does not happen,
you mean you will be very surprised if it happens or does not happen. If we can’t beat a second-rate team like Sheffield, I’ll eat my hat.

If the cap fits, wear it: (British, American & Australian, American):something that you say to tell someone that if they are guilty of something bad, they should accept criticism. Look, I didn’t say who was to blame for this mess – but if the cap fits, wear it.

keep something under your hat:to keep something secret. I’ve got some interesting news, but you must promise to keep it under your hat for the moment.

old hat: if something is old hat, it is not new or modern any more. A 24-hour banking service may seem old hat in the United States, but it’s still innovative in Europe.

pass the hat around/round: to collect money from a group of people. We’re passing the hat round for Simon’s leaving present.

pull a rabbit out of the hat: to surprise everyone by suddenly doing something that shows a lot of skill, often in order to solve a problem. He’s one of those players who, just when you think the game’s over, can pull a rabbit out of the hat.

throw/toss your hat in the ring (American & Australian): to do something that makes it clear you want to compete with other people, especially to compete for a political position. She’s seriously considering throwing her hat in the ring and declaring herself a candidate for the election.

with your [teacher’s/lawyer’s etc.] hat on: be wearing your [teacher’s/lawyer’s etc.] hat – to be acting as you do when you are working as a teacher, lawyer etc., which may be different from the way you act in other situations. I’d like to talk to you with your lawyer’s hat on.

at the drop of a hat: suddenly, without any planning and for no obvious reason. He’d buy her expensive clothing at the drop of a hat and worry about how he would pay for it later.

hang your hat on something:1. to depend on something. The company’s earnings were up 70% last year, but I don’t think you can hang your hat on that kind of growth.
. 2. to believe something. It’s hard to hang your hat on a lack of money as the real reason they didn’t take the trip.

hat in hand: with an attitude of respect for someone powerful. The Secretary of Defense must go to Congress, hat in hand, to get approval to close military bases.

🙂 So I would hang my hat on your effort in English study.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: